Writing: Ignorance and Ergonomics

by Beauchamp Art

Further extracts from the work in progress text, Motherland of Exiles.


The only ignorance in the Metro is wilful ignorance. No one is any more or less intelligent then they need or would otherwise want to be, and as for most, if not all citizens, reality perfectly aligns with hopes and expectations, then their desire for any further knowledge is minimal, particularly because of the abundance of information.

With the efficiency and availability of the archives for popular use, the need to learn anything beyond the ability to navigate the available resources is scare; to make any such intellectual leaps beyond the established framework of understanding is beyond not only the question of desire but also of comprehension, though never are the people censored nor their access prohibited through any direct means of control.

There are no wall without doors or windows for the citizenry, but every room is so tailored and comfortable, they have, for the most part, no desire to look, let along step out of their personal sanctum. There are no prisons but the ones built into the individuals’ mind, but they have no longing to wander nor stray, as they have learned that any such derivations can only lead to dereliction and disaster.

Nevertheless, there are those whose minds to stray, though any outward looking curiosity is still within the framework of wilful ignorance. The scientist may look to further his research, but only within their specialist field: the artist may use a multitude of media, but still within an established conceptual framework: the philosophers and writers will strive for every more innovative means for expressing and re interpreting the same selection of ideas. The wheel will be repeatedly reinvented, turning over and over, all progress part of a constant and stable revolution of thought, rotation ever more elegantly on its axis. The left field will but ploughed whilst the right remains fallow, and sewn in its turn.

 


 

Nature itself has been nurtured. Even something as seeming innocuous as hand preference has been authored, and written out of the potential problems during development which could lead to a level of ostracisation socially and internal as a personal prejudice which is totally unbenifical, thus all are ambidextrous, but activities are taught on the basis of specific hand bias, but tasks are equally shared, with some assignments based on hemisphere relevance, others in terms of other practicalities, so certain tools can be designed more ergonomically for the left or right hand : so a pen may be designed to suit the right hand better, but as an object in isolation may seem unnecessarily asymmetrical, but in practicality is far more fitting for an individual’s hand.

However, as most such differences are negligible, a uniformity and symmetry of objects may be preferential for the ease of design and mass production, so the actual production of hand-specific items is fairly spartan, though illustrates the thorough consideration is given to even the simplest of tools for the benefit of the citizens by the those for whom their role is to arrange such matters. Moreover, any such over specialisation is also indicative of the need to remain wary when approaching problem solving, so as not to generate further, unnecessary or more complex problems. Such meta-problematising may often simple result in inelegant solutions where a simple one may suffice, as in Occum’s Razor.

For example, in the case of the right handed pen, this tool would render itself redundant if it could only comfortably be used by one hand, and by unfortunate circumstance, such as injury, stroke or more simply that hand was otherwise occupied by another right-specific activity, then the ability to write would be drastically undermined, when, more simply, an ambidextrous pen always enable the greatest range of usefulness, thus be the most efficient in the long term.

Every piece must have its place, but that is no reason to discount the benefit of interchangeablity. As in manufacturing, every labourer is as interchangeable as each component being produced, due to the compartmentalisation of the work processes, which has been applied effectively to the rest of society.

Every player has their part on the stage of life, and there is no longer any need for fools to fall through the cracks.

The sinister and the dexterous have come together with a unifying clap, growing to one great applause as ever citizen joins hands in a heavenly harmony, all glory in the sea of noise, lapping in steady waves, as one body, one tide of many droplets, rising and falling as one tremendous force of nature.

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